Today we are addicted to speed, to cramming more and more into every minute. This roadrunner culture is taking a toll on everything from our health, diet and work to our communities, relationships and the environment. That is why the Slow Movement is taking off.

 

 
 

In the modern era of globalisation, as we rapidly plunder through earth’s resources, the widespread mentality that ‘faster is better’ has become favoured at the expense of quality and longevity. Our desire for a ‘quick fix’ to health problems, ‘food on the go’ that often lacks nutrition, and a preference for mass-produced products that warrant cheap labour have created a disconnection within our society. Is this loss of care for each other and the planet justifiable for the time and money that we feel we are saving? 

In Italy, where traditional culture inextricably links food and community, there began a small uprising in 1986 when fast food giant McDonald's announced plans to open in Rome’s Piazza di Spagna. Subsequent protests sparked the creation of the ’Slow Food’ movement and by the 90s Slow Food had grown exponentially. Over time, ‘Slow’ subcultures have developed in other areas like the Cittaslow organisation for Slow cities. In 2004, English journalist Carl Honoré published ‘In praise of slow: how a worldwide movement is challenging the cult of speed’ explaining various aspects of the movement:

 
“It seems to me that we are moving towards an historical turning point. For at least 150 years everything has been getting faster and for the most part speed was doing us more good than harm in that time. But in recent years we’ve entered the phase of diminishing returns. Today we are addicted to speed, to cramming more and more into every minute. This roadrunner culture is taking a toll on everything from our health, diet and work to our communities, relationships and the environment. That is why the Slow Movement is taking off.”
— Carl Honoré
 
 
The Slow philosophy is not about doing everything at a snail’s pace. It’s about seeking to do everything at the right speed. Savouring the hours and minutes rather than just counting them. Doing everything as well as possible, instead of as fast as possible. It’s about quality over quantity.”
— Carl Honoré